Josh Tosteson

Josh TostesonJoshua Tosteson currently serves as the vice president, programs, planning and assessment at the Rainforest Alliance. In this role, he is responsible for managing sustainability assessment and certification activities in agriculture, forestry, carbon and related services, with a portfolio of clients in approximately 80 countries covering more than 70 million hectares of managed lands.

Prior to these assignments, Josh served as the co-director of Project Nouvelle Vie, a project based in Haiti that conducted integrated education and training in leadership, permaculture and entrepreneurship for young adults. The project worked closely with more than 300 students in two years, serving tens of thousands of Haitians through the students’ community development initiatives.

For seven years (2001-2008) Josh served as president and director of HydroGen Corporation, a company that commercialized a megawatt-class stationary fuel cell technology. In this capacity, he started the company, recruited an executive team and Board of Directors, raised more than $40 million in private and public funding, brought the company public and oversaw technology and market development, culminating in successful full scale demonstration of the technology as well as major strategic and distribution agreements with the Samsung Corporation.

Josh spent the early years of his career conducting research and teaching. He was the first graduate student accepted to the Earth Institute at Columbia University, where he conducted research on the utilization of forecasts of El Niño, leading to a Master’s Degree in atmospheric sciences (1999). During his time at Columbia, he taught courses on human-environment interactions for graduate and undergraduate students and took on numerous consulting assignments. Prior to his time at Columbia, he was the curriculum coordinator and a management consultant at the Biosphere 2 research facility in Arizona. He completed his undergraduate degree in a self-developed major in environmental science and public policy in 1994 from Harvard University, completing his thesis under the direction of Kennedy School Professor William C. Clark.