The Monte Pascoal-Pau Brasil Ecological Corridor: Carbon, Community and Biodiversity Initiative

Project Type: 

Reforestation

Area: 

25 acres (11 hectares); projected to impact nearly 2,500 acres (1,000 hectares)

Location(s): 

Brazil – Bahia State

Developer(s): 

Instituto de Conservação Ambiental – The Nature Conservancy do Brasil, Conservation International, Instituto Bioatlântica, Instituto Cidade, Grupo Ambiental Natureza Bela, Associação dos Nativos de Caraíva – ANAC (Association of Native People of Caraíva), Associação Comunitária Beneficente de Nova Caraíva – ASCBENC (Community Association of Nova Caraíva) and Cooperativa de Reflorestadores de Mata Atlântica do Extremo Sul da Bahia – CooPlantar (Atlantic Forest Reforestation Cooperative of the Far South of Bahia)

Report: 

Rainforest Alliance Evaluation: 

Validated conformance with the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards 1st Ed., Gold Level: October 22nd, 2009 – October 21st, 2014 (RA-VAL-CCB-011405).

This project aims to establish a biodiversity corridor that will join two large sections of Atlantic Forest (a global biodiversity hotspot)—the Pau Brasil and Monte Pascoal national parks. The primary aim of the project is to restore native ecosystems through reforestation work, with a focus on degraded lands and pasturelands held by private landowners in the Caraíva river basin, which connects the two national parks. Local residents, landowners and the network of partner organizations that are involved in the project believe that it will benefit affected communities by creating jobs, generating income and building local knowledge and capacity to conserve and restore forests. Given these outstanding benefits to local communities and the project’s positive impacts on the Atlantic Forest’s ecosystem and biodiversity, it was awarded the coveted "Gold Level" validation to the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standards. Twenty-five acres (11 hectares) have already achieved validation, and more than 2,470 acres (1,000 hectares) are expected to be reforested over the project’s 30-year lifetime.

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