Our Efforts Are Taking Flight

For migratory birds, whose very survival depends on the conservation of habitat across borders, the conversion of forests to farmland poses a real threat. Through our work in agriculture, forestry and tourism, we’re helping to conserve habitat for both migratory and nonmigratory birds. A few examples...

Surrounded by waterfalls, lakes, forests and a volcano, the Hotel Catarata Río Celeste in Costa Rica has instituted a community reforestation project to plant over 2,000 native trees, which provide habitat to hummingbirds, blue jays, toucans and other birds. (Photo by Veronica Muñoz)

In North America, Domtar -- the continent’s largest producer of uncoated paper -- has committed to achieving Forest Stewardship Council certification on 100 percent of the land it owns and manages. Domtar-managed forests support a biologically diverse mix of species, such as bald eagles, moose and brook trout. (Photo by Alexandria Urgo)

Nueva Granada, a Rainforest Alliance Certified™ coffee farm nestled between two of Guatemala’s tallest volcanoes, supports tall hardwoods and productive fruit trees that provide habitat for a rich variety of wildlife, including migratory songbirds like Baltimore orioles, Tennessee warblers and Cape May warblers. (Photo by Aventuras de Sarapiqui)

Mot mots, parrots and doves roost in the cedar, cuernavaca, oak and inga trees near Finca Santa Isabel, a Rainforest Alliance Certified coffee farm in southeastern Guatemala.

The forests of India’s Western Ghats are home to assorted wildlife, including hornbills, Asian elephants and Bengal tigers -- species threatened by the conversion of verdant hillsides to coffee and tea plantations. Fortunately, the work spearheaded by two conservation scientists and spouses is offering much-needed habitat protection.

The Lodge at Cha Creek -- featured in SustainableTrip.org, the Rainforest Alliance’s database of responsible tourism businesses -- includes a 365-acre private nature reserve, where birds including the blue-crowned motmot, the violaceous trogon and the grey-necked wood rail, roost. (Photo by Christopher Ciccone)

In Bolivia’s eastern lowlands, the FSC/Rainforest Alliance Certified Angel Sandoval concession is working diligently to protect local wildlife. Angel Sandoval even allows researchers and biologists to do fieldwork within their concession. (Pictured here: a rufous casiornis.)

search multimedia

Title

Multimedia by Type:

Multimedia by Language:

Search form